Is aa for free?

There are no fees or fees for AA membership. Usually, an AA group will have a fundraiser during the meeting to cover expenses such as rent, coffee, etc.

Is aa for free?

There are no fees or fees for AA membership. Usually, an AA group will have a fundraiser during the meeting to cover expenses such as rent, coffee, etc. Members are free to contribute as much or as little as they wish. Anyone who wants to stop drinking is welcome, regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, income or profession.

Only you can decide if you want to try A, A. A if you think it can help you. Below are some questions that we try to answer honestly. There is no dishonor in facing the fact that you have a problem.

There are no membership fees or fees for AA. Each AA group usually has a collection box or designated time during the meeting to make donations to help cover expenses, such as rent, pamphlets or coffee. Members are not obliged to contribute and can contribute as much or as little as they wish. Can AA help you? The only way to find out is to try it and see for yourself if you think that the help and support of others struggling with the same problem will help you stay sober.

AA has no fees or fees, so it won't cost you anything to attend a meeting. The effect of AA is best seen when a correct dose is given, usually 90 meetings in 90 days. Trying a couple of meetings is not a proper test. An AA meeting can take one of several forms, but at any meeting you will find alcoholics talking about what drinking did to their lives and personalities, the actions they took to help themselves, and how they are living their lives today.

Therefore, each individual should research their options to determine if the spiritual approach to recovery that AA provides is ideal for their recovery. While this is not a guarantee of available seats, it does provide more flexibility when you travel with a MileSaaver award. AA is independent of religious or political affiliation, and AA's 12 traditions protect this mission. The AA program, established in the Twelve Steps, offers the alcoholic a way to develop a satisfying life without alcohol.

Most meetings will encourage newcomers to avoid contributing until they have identified whether AA as a whole, or the specific meeting they are attending, is right for them. The AA member continues to be supported by the structure of the meeting and the group, only with the presence of their families. Head office, intergroup, or answering service numbers worldwide are available on the AA World Services website. In addition to living a life of sobriety, this is one of the most rewarding parts of being an AA member.

Many AA members receive counseling at the same time and share how their counseling supports their recovery. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is a 12-step recovery program that supports people struggling with alcohol addiction. In the “Big Book”, the central text of AA describing the program, the 12 steps are defined as a “set of principles, spiritual in nature, when practiced as a way of life, can drive out the obsession of drinking and allow the patient to become happy and usefully complete. You or your AA group can purchase products such as tokens and medallions to indicate your sobriety stages.

For people who are not comfortable with the spiritual aspect of the program or the 12-step AA recovery, there are alternative 12-step programs that are also free.

Warren Dicola
Warren Dicola

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