Is alcoholics anonymous christian?

AA Is Built on Christianity Alcoholics Anonymous was inspired by the Oxford Group, following traditional Christianity. The Big Book also includes prayer and meditation, with prayers that mention God, sometimes requiring members to read the Bible and that prayer be part of the service.

Is alcoholics anonymous christian?

AA Is Built on Christianity Alcoholics Anonymous was inspired by the Oxford Group, following traditional Christianity. The Big Book also includes prayer and meditation, with prayers that mention God, sometimes requiring members to read the Bible and that prayer be part of the service. Alcoholics Anonymous is a program with vaguely Christian roots, but it does not depend on the power of the Gospel to bring about change. The founders of AA were members of a fundamentalist Christian Protestant movement, the Oxford Group.

Its members “practiced absolute surrender, the guidance of the Holy Spirit, sharing in communion, life-changing faith, and prayer. Its goal was to establish absolute standards of Love, Purity, Honesty and Generosity, which later became an integral part of A, A. There is a growing debate about whether AA should be considered a religion. In many ways, AA seems Christian in its approach, but if we take a closer look at it, AA is neither Christian nor moral according to the usual definitions of the word.

In fact, at many junctures it is clear that the most appropriate interpretation of “God in the Community of AA” is the Community of AA, as expressed in the acronym Good Orderly Direction. Alcoholics Anonymous was founded by Christians in the 1930s. Today's organization has distanced itself from those religious roots, but traces remain. As a child in my teens, I've been to dozens and dozens of Alcoholics Anonymous meetings.

At least this was believed when AA published its original text (the “Big Book, Alcoholics Anonymous”) in 1939, and despite the publication of this book in three more editions since then, this original text has not changed (except for the personal stories at the end of the book). Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is a ubiquitous mutual aid recovery organization that continues to stir up controversy, partly because of the program's spiritual orientation. The traditions of AA, formulated in the 1930s, state that “AA has no opinion on external issues” and considers any political group or religion to be an external issue and totally irrelevant to the core group's collective purpose of recovering from alcoholism and addictive diseases. In 1951, AA won the American Public Health Association's Lasker Prize (considered the American equivalent of the Nobel Prize); former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger described it as “America's gift to the world”; and AA's original text, Alcoholics Anonymous (ranks out of just 88 books) that “have shaped the United States at the United States Library of Congress.

Similar to the first impression that this hospital administrator of addiction treatment had in the 1930s, doctors today could be forgiven for initially viewing with skepticism and concern the idea of helping people recover from alcohol and drug use disorders that threaten the life and that weaken an apparently spiritual program led by peers without professional clinical training. Alcoholics Anonymous seems to be an effective clinical and public health ally that helps addiction recovery through its ability to mobilize therapeutic mechanisms similar to those mobilized in formal treatment, but is able to do so free of charge in the long term in the communities where people live. My mother who died several years ago struggled with alcohol addiction for most of her life; she was enslaved to alcohol for more than twenty years. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is a global mutual aid organization for recovery that continues to stir up controversy.

Many regular church attendees will probably know that they have these anonymous tenants, and there must be few towns or cities that haven't seen or heard of AA. .

Warren Dicola
Warren Dicola

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