Is alcoholics anonymous religious?

AA emerged from the Oxford Group, an altruistic and non-denominational movement inspired by first-century Christianity. Some members founded the group to help maintain sobriety.

Is alcoholics anonymous religious?

AA emerged from the Oxford Group, an altruistic and non-denominational movement inspired by first-century Christianity. Some members founded the group to help maintain sobriety. The basic principles of Alcoholics Anonymous were developed in the late 1930s and early 1940s, during which co-founder Bill W. It is often referred to as the “trial and error” period of the Fellowship.

The founding members had been using six steps borrowed from the Oxford Groups, where many of them started. Bill thought more specific instructions would be better, and in the course of writing A, A. But he was dealing with a group of freshly sober drunks, and it's not for nothing that his new version met with lively opposition. Although the founding members were in many ways a homogeneous group (white, middle-class, almost exclusively men and mainly Christians of origin), they represented the entire spectrum of opinions and beliefs.

Bill tells us in Alcoholic anonymous Comes of Age, a story from the early years of the Fellowship, that “the heated debate over the Twelve Steps and the book's content doubled and doubled. There were conservative, liberal and radical views. And atheists and agnostics wanted to remove all references to God and take a psychological approach. More than sixty years later, these crucial commitments, articulated after weeks of heated controversy, have made it possible for alcoholics of all religions, or without any faith, to adopt A, A.

Recovery and Long-Lasting Sobriety Program. However, the phrase “spiritual awakening”, found in the Twelfth Step and along A, A. Literature is still overwhelming for many beginners. For some, it evokes a dramatic “conversion experience”, not an attractive idea for an alcoholic who has just come out of a drunkard.

For others, despondent by years of constant alcohol consumption, it seems completely out of reach. But for those who persevere, continued sobriety almost invariably leads to the realization that, in some wonderful and unexpected way, they have undergone a spiritual change. Group customs that seem religious sometimes discourage new people from returning. Professionals who refer people to A, A.

You can help by advising them to attend a variety of meetings, especially in the first year of sobriety, and to look for a homegroup where they feel comfortable. According to A, A. Therefore, even if a trembling alcoholic finds himself one night at a meeting where members feel at home with traditional religious language, he can try again the next night and find a group in which even the most skeptical or cynical soul fits perfectly. The groups that continue to close with the Lord's Prayer follow a custom established in the early days of the Community, when many of the founding members found their support at the Oxford Group meetings.

It is very likely that the practice of ending the Lord's prayer will come directly from those meetings. At that time, there was no A, A. Literature, so the founders relied heavily on Bible readings for inspiration and guidance. They probably ended up with the Lord's Prayer because, as Bill W.

He explained that he “did not put speakers to the task, embarrassing for many, of composing their own sentences. Meeting formats became more inclusive once A, A. It began to spread throughout North America and then to the rest of the world, and it became clear that the recovery program could cross all barriers of creed, race and religion. You can help people affected by alcoholism by making a donation to the Cleveland District Office.

The founders of AA were members of a fundamentalist Christian Protestant movement, the Oxford Group. Its members “practiced absolute surrender, the guidance of the Holy Spirit, sharing in communion, life-changing faith, and prayer. Their goal was to achieve absolute standards of Love, Purity, Honesty and Selflessness, which later became an integral part of A, A. Yes, although you may have to do some internal mental gymnastics to be okay with it.

At least this was believed when AA published its original text (the “Big Book, Alcoholics Anonymous”) in 1939, and despite the publication of this book in three more editions since then, this original text has not changed (except for the personal stories at the end of the book). One of the most common misconceptions about Alcoholics Anonymous is that it is a religious organization. With the publication of his basic text, Alcoholics Anonymous, in 1939, AA's message quickly spread around the world, bringing to life a variety of Twelve Step groups. More than sixty years later, these crucial commitments, articulated after weeks of heated controversy, have made it possible for alcoholics of all religions, or without any faith, to adopt the A.

Many people who try Alcoholics Anonymous, or even those who don't but have heard of it, think it's a religious organization. Whatever you do, don't let someone else's religious beliefs prevent you from finding the solution that is available to you through Alcoholics Anonymous. The Haynes Clinic is an alcohol and drug rehabilitation clinic that offers detoxification and counseling for people with addictions. What the Steps do is frame these principles for the alcoholic who suffers, is sick, afraid, defiant and resolutely determined not to be told what to do, think or believe.

Alcoholics Anonymous seems to be an effective clinical and public health ally that helps addiction recovery through its ability to mobilize therapeutic mechanisms similar to those mobilized in formal treatment, but is able to do so free of charge in the long term in the communities where people live. For AA, “alcoholism is not understood in purely medical terms, it has a deeply moral dimension. The Twelve Steps is arguably the best-known and most widespread recovery program from alcoholism disease (a widely known concept that helped to normalize) in today's world. .

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Warren Dicola
Warren Dicola

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