Why is it called al-anon?

In 1951, al-anon was officially established with 56 member groups throughout the continental United States. They chose the name of the first syllables of Alcoholics Anonymous and, in accordance with the founding principles, adopted the Twelve Steps (and later the Twelve Traditions) in a slightly modified form.

Why is it called al-anon?

In 1951, al-anon was officially established with 56 member groups throughout the continental United States. They chose the name of the first syllables of Alcoholics Anonymous and, in accordance with the founding principles, adopted the Twelve Steps (and later the Twelve Traditions) in a slightly modified form. In May 1951, Anne B. wrote a letter to the original 87 A, A.

family groups (including some lone members). One of the questions was: “Do you approve of the name A, A. family Group? If not, what do you suggest? In March 1952, members selected the name Al-Anon Family Groups. The word “Al-Anon” is simply a derivative of Alcoholics Anonymous, combining the first syllables of each word.

The first letter is dated “May 1951” and the entire month is traditionally recognized as the anniversary of Al-Anon. The Alateen groups began in September 1957, in Pasadena, California. The service conference was held April 20-23, 1961 in New York City, NY, at the George Washington Hotel. The circle within the triangle was approved at the 1968 World Service Conference.

Bob, co-founder of A, A. died in 1949 before the Al-Anon clearing house was founded. Prints with registration dates are sent to Area Delegates or Group Record Coordinators twice a year. Many Al-Anon Information Services offices keep these hard copies and can provide you with an answer.

If your area can't find the information, ask your Archives Coordinator to contact Group Records at WSO. Some historical events from A, A. are listed in the Lois Remembers chronology (B-. The word “Al-Anon” is simply a derivative of Alcoholics Anonymous, which combines the first syllables of each word.

In 1951, Lois and Anne created a Clearing House Committee to serve 87 investigators and coordinate and serve them. Through this effort, 56 groups responded. They chose the name of their groups from the first syllables of Alcoholics Anonymous and adopted the name of Al-Anon Family Groups. They adopted the Twelve Steps of AA and later the Twelve Traditions, in the slightly modified form we know today.

They offered the use of a room at their club in New York City for family group volunteers, and in January 1952, the family group headquarters moved from Stepping Stones to the clubhouse on 24A, A. Street and became a “family group information clearinghouse.” Al-Anon's headquarters remained there until 1957, when it was moved to 125 East 23rd Street. Members selected the name “Al-Anon Family Groups” for their growing community. Al-Anon, on the other hand, is designed for relatives of people with alcohol problems.

The name comes from the first syllables of Alcoholics Anonymous, “al” and “anon”. The only requirement to attend these meetings is to have someone close in your life who is an alcoholic. It's important to remember that drug or alcohol addiction, known clinically as substance use disorder (SUD), is a family illness. While Al-Anon is designed for adult participation, there is also a program for family members under 21 called Alateen.

Anne was the wife of a chronically relapsing alcoholic who had sought release from her fears and personal recovery from the effects of living with an alcoholic by starting a Family Group in Westchester County, New York.

Warren Dicola
Warren Dicola

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